How minerals beat fatigue


Minerals:  Your Body’s Energy Sparks

Majid Ali, M.D.

There are two types of minerals in the study of human nutrition: (1) those that assist oxygen in preserving health and reversing chronic disease; and (2) those that block oxygen-driven healing systems of the body and cause disease. Examples of the first group (“good minerals”) include calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, zinc, copper, iodine, chromium, selenium, molybdenum, and maganese. Major examples in the second group (“toxic minerals”) are lead, mercury, aluminum, cadmium, and arsenic. Most minerals, like most vitamins, are needed in small amounts to support the metabolic reactions, such as digestion, absorption, detox, waste removal, and detergent functions in the body. Appropriate mineral intake amounts have been established for some, but not all, minerals. Supplementation in the hands of experienced clinical nutritionists is extremely valuable in preserving health and reversing chronic disease. Many foods are fortified with nutrients, such as cereals with added vitamins and milk with vitamin D, orange juice fortified with calcium, salt fortified with iodine, and others.


Where Does Blood Borrow Its Minerals From Majid Ali MD from Majid Ali on Vimeo.


Minerals As Sparks

Nature chose oxygen to drive human evolution. Oxygen harnessed minerals to create high-efficiency energy metabolism. It organized the forerunners of cells called primordial spherules around minerals. The minerals so chosen served oxygen as the spark for the transfer of electron energy in the energy reactions in the body. Electrons are packets of energy within atoms and molecules. For example, magnesium forms the core mineral center of the plant pigment called chlorophyll which is essential for trapping the energy of sunlight in leaves of trees, bushes, and vegetable plants. Magnesium also forms the core mineral center of the system that generates a high-energy compound called ATP in the body.

Minerals As Enzyme and Vitamin Cofactors

In the tutorial entitled “Enzymes: Oxygen’s Workhorses,” I explained that enzymes are oxygen’s workhorses which facilitate biochemical reactions, including the digestion of foods, energy generation, waste removal, and detoxification. Injured cells cannot heal without enzymes, nor the immune system work without them. Most enzymes cannot work without minerals, which in such roles are called enzymes cofactors. Since most vitamins work as enzymes, it follows that vitamins also need minerals as enzyme cofactors.

Basic Information About Selected Minerals

Below is a brief description of important minerals and their healthful roles in the body. Further details are presented in later tutorials in the course on minerals.

Sodium

Common table salt is sodium chloride and is composed of one atom of sodium and chloride. It is a systemic electrolyte and is essential in the regulation of ATP energy. Dietary sources include table salt (sodium chloride, the main source), sea vegetables, milk, and spinach. Generally required daily amounts range from 1250 to 1500 mg.

 


Potassium, Sodium, and Neurotransmission Majid Ali MD from Majid Ali on Vimeo.


Potassium

It is a systemic electrolyte and is essential in the regulation of ATP energy. Dietary sources include legumes, potato skin, tomatoes, and bananas. Generally required daily amounts range from 4200 to 4800 mg.


How Much Potassium Do I Take Majid Ali MD from Majid Ali on Vimeo.


Calcium

It is essential for the healthful structure and function of muscle (including heart), digestive system, and the formation and function of blood cells. Dietary sources of calcium include dairy products, canned fish with bones (salmon, sardines), green leafy vegetables, nuts and seeds. Generally required daily amounts range from 1000 to 1200 mg.


How Much Calcium Should You Take Majid Ali MD from Majid Ali on Vimeo.


Magnesium

It is needed for the generation and utilization of ATP energy. Dietary sources include nuts, soybeans, and cocoa. Generally required daily amounts range from 450 to 750 mg.


How Much Magnesium Should You Take Majid Ali MD from Majid Ali on Vimeo.


Iron

Is the core energy center of two of the most important proteins in the body: hemoglobin (which oxygen rides to all regions of the body) and myoglobin (which oxygen regulates for the health of the muscle). Hemoglobin deficiency is called anemia. Iron is essential for the function of many enzymes. Dietary sources include red meat, leafy green vegetables, fish (tuna, salmon), eggs, dried fruits, beans, whole grains. Generally required daily amounts range from 7 to 10 mg.

Iodine

Iodine is required for the synthesis of thyroid hormones and to prevent goiter. It is also needed in other body organs, such as the breast, salivary glands, stomach, and thymus (an immune organ located in front of the heart). Generally required daily amounts range from 125 to 200 µg.

Zinc

Zinc is required for the actions of a very large number of enzymes. Generally required daily amounts range from 10 to 25 mg.


Zinc, Don’t Forget It to Take It, Please! Majid Ali MD from Majid Ali on Vimeo.


Manganese

In trace amounts, it is a cofactor in enzyme functions. Generally required daily amounts range from 2 to 4 mg.

Copper

In trace amounts, it is a required component of many crucial enzymes involved with oxidant/antioxidant balance of the body, such as cytochrome c oxidase. Generally required daily amounts range from 750 to 1,000 microgram (µg).

A Historical Note

Civilization began when humans acquired an ability to mold metals into tools. Hunting, and later agriculture became the method for securing food supply. Heavy metal toxicity began when humans turned some of those tools into killing devices-first in conflicts where men and women were murdered individually, then in battles decimating large populations But now—it seems to me—we are entering the most destructive era of heavy metal toxicity. This is an era when heavy metals do not produce fields littered with dying bodies. Rather, it is a period of heavy metal toxicity—mercury leading the charge this time—in which toxic metals destroy humans from within. The brain and immune cells are most sensitive to such toxicity. Mercury and lead are also especially toxic to the acid-alkali and antioxidant-oxidant systems of the body. Additional information about the functions of various minerals and their clinical uses are presented in other tutorials on minerals.


Mercury Chelation – Say NO to DMPS, Please! Majid Ali MD from Majid Ali on Vimeo.


Your Child – Hyperactive or Metal-toxic Majid Ali MD from Majid Ali on Vimeo.


Read more at Essential Vitamins


 

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Mercury Toxicity BOOK and VIDEOS
Mercury Course by Prof Majid Ali  (Combination of all items below) only $19.95

Mercury Toxicity and Detoxification Book In his book “Mercury Toxicity and Detox with Chelation and the Oxygen Protocol,” Professor Majid Alidraws upon his five decades of experience as a pathologist and integrative physicians to present a comprehensive account of the sources and clinical features of mercury toxicity, and them describes his safe and effective oral mercury chelation protocols. He also describes his supportive oxystatic (oxygen-enhancing) nutritional, herbal, and spice protocols for use with chelation.

Mercury Toxicity and Detox With Chelation  Seminar One In this 55-minute video seminar, Professor Majid Ali presents the biochemical, bioenergetic, and clinical aspects of mercury toxicity. He relates some illuminating case histories of mercury toxicity, and discusses various chelation options to remove mercury. He cautions against rapid mercury removal with chelation and warns against the use of intravenous DMPS chelation. Then he describes his preferred protocols of DMSA and mercury EDTA chelation. In Part 2, he focuses on molecular pathways of chelation and presents patterns of mercury removal. Mercury Toxicity and Detox With Chelation Seminar Two In this 40-minute video seminar, Professor Majid Ali continues his discussion of toxic biochemical, bioenergetic, and clinical effects of mercury in the body. He explains his Oxygen Model of Mecury Toxicity and describes differential mercury deposits in the various organs of the body. He presents case studies to illustrate his main points and patterns of mercury removal with DMSA and EDTA, as well weak yet important mercury chelators, such as lipoic acid, chlorella, cilantro, chlorophyll, and others. He cautions against rapid mercury removal with chelation and warns against the use of intravenous DMPS chelation.


 

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