COLITIS


COLITIS: WHAT’S IN A NAME?
Majid Ali, M.D.

My own ecologic thinking, as I recall it, began one day in 1969. As a pathology resident, I received a large basin brimming with a messy inflamed and distended colon with copious bloody fecal matter spilling out of some tears in its wall. It was not much fun to clean that bowel and take tissue samples for preparing microscopic slides. The next day I examined the slides and observed the expected microscopic features of ulcerative colitis: acute and chronic inflammation, dead and dying immune and other types of cells, ulceration of the lining mucosa, disruption of the general architecture of the colon wall, and pockets of pus. After finishing my study, I took the case to one of my professors. He examined the slides and agreed that it was a case of ulcerative colitis.

The next day, something unexpected happened. Without purpose, I picked another slide of that colon, looked at it, and chanced upon a cluster of large, pale cells forming a discrete round structure. Such a formation is called a granuloma and is considered diagnostic of Crohn’s colitis. “Look at that!” I said to myself in surprise. “Now, that granuloma makes it Crohn’s colitis, doesn’t it? Yesterday it was ulcerative colitis. Today it seems to be Crohn’s colitis. Interesting!” I marked the microscopic field with ink and took the slides to a second professor, since the first one was out of the department. He looked at the case and readily diagnosed Crohn’s colitis.

The next day as I prepared to carry the slides to one of the secretaries for filing, I picked another slide from the same case and started gazing at an area that showed discrete layers of tissue debris covering small patches of the inner surface of the bowel wall. Those are the features of another common type of colitis called pseudomembranous colitis. “Aha! Another diagnosis!” I exclaimed. “Let’s see if I can get someone also to agree with me.” That time I purposefully looked for a third professor and decided not to tell him about the diagnoses made by the other two. I pointed out to him the membrane-like structures and he agreed that we had a case of pseudomembranous colitis. I returned to my desk triumphantly.

I went back to that colon and took many more sections of tissues. A technician looked at me, a little annoyed because she had to prepare the slides from all those sections. The next day she brought me several trays of slides and I went to work. In one of the slides, I found areas that showed well-preserved bowel architecture, congested blood vessels, pooled and disintegrating red blood cells in the tissue, and small surface erosions. Bingo! I knew those were the features of another type of colitis called ischemic colitis. I continued my search. I was not disappointed. I found some microscopic fields that showed diagnostic features of a type of colitis called collagenous colitis. “Ah! Another diagnosis!” I congratulated myself and continued study of the case with yet other slides. There were many fields which could only be diagnosed as nonspecific colitis. With some more persistence I found other areas qualifying for other forms of colitis. Getting my teachers to agree to those various diagnoses with different slides of the same colon did not prove to be difficult either. I spoke to Talat, my wife, about my accomplishment, but decided not to tell my professors about it. I did not know how some of them might take it.

Next I turned my attention to my pathology textbooks for a critical study of the causes of those various types of colitis. That turned out to be a yet more fruitful search. I made the second and equally important discovery: The cause of none of those types of colitis was known. It was not that dozens of pages of those texts were not filled with discussion of the etiology (cause) of all those types of colitis. For every type of colitis, some immune disorder, infectious agent, or vascular event was suspected or proposed, but in every case the final conclusion was always the same: The cause is not fully understood.

That search led me to a third important discovery: There is such a large overlap in the clinical symptomatology, microscopic appearances, and suspected causes that there was hardly any point in slavishly adhering to the system of classification of colitis which I was being taught as “science.”

The young pathologist in me was jolted by his three discoveries. An image of several blind men surrounding an elephant arose in my mind’s eye. During the weeks and months that followed, some vague, ill-defined notion of altered states of bowel ecology began to evolve. It took me several years before I could muster courage to begin writing about what I thought were my awkward notions of bowel pathology, which I thought would be heartily laughed at.

The Bowel Ecosystem

In my view, the most remarkable phenomenon in the entire field of human biology is this: A vast number of clinical problems that are seemingly unrelated to the bowel spontaneously resolve when the focus of clinical management turns to all the issues in bowel ecology. How often do symptoms of persistent debilitating fatigue in young men and women clear up when an altered state of bowel ecology is restored to normal? How often do troublesome mood swings subside when therapies focus on the bowel? How often does arthralgia (pain and stiffness in joints with or without joint swelling) resolve when all the bowel issues are addressed? How often do we successfully prevent chronic headache and anxiety; lightheadedness and palpitations; menstrual irregularities and incapacitating PMS; recurrent attacks of vaginitis and cystitis; recurrent sore throats and asthma; and eczema and related skin lesions by correcting the abnormalities in the internal environment of the bowel? The answers to these questions will vary widely among physicians.

Physicians who regularly neglect the bowel (and those who never understood the issues of bowel ecology in the first place) will dismiss these questions with scorn. None of this has been proven with double-blind cross-over studies, they will strenuously protest. Other physicians who have learned to respect the bowel—as the ancients did—and care for their patients with a sharp focus on bowel issues will readily and unequivocally validate my personal (and fairly extensive) clinical experience.

LIFE IN THE BOWEL ECOSYSTEM

The bowel ecosystem teems with life. Shrouded in metabolic mists, it is as rich in biologic diversity and as broad in biochemical interrelationships as any other ecosystem on this planet Earth. The ancients seemed to have an intuitive sense about it. Death begins in the bowel, they pronounced in more than one way. Anton van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) studied fecal bacteria during his work with the microscope and thus was the first man to study life in the bowel ecosystem with modern scientific methods. Metchnikoff, the Russian biologist, who single-handedly developed the concept of the cellular arm of the immune system, became intensely interested in the aging process in his later years when he moved to Paris, where he served as the head of the Pasteur Institute. He studied the longevity of Bulgarians and provided strong evidence that certain bowel microbes played important roles in preserving health and promoting longevity among them. He named the microbe he thought was most prominent in this field as Lactobacillus bulgaricus. Metchnikoff’s work opened the floodgates of basic research on the bowel flora.

Dr. Ali’s 8 Videos on the BOWEL & GUT
Dr. Ali discusses his opinion that the most remarkable phenomenon in the entire field of human biology is this:
A vast number of clinical problems that are seemingly unrelated to the bowel spontaneously resolve when the focus of clinical management turns to all the issues in bowel ecology.

 

As roots are to roses, so the bowel to the brain. As roots are to roses, so the bowel to the skin. As roots are to roses, so the bowel to the heart. As roots are to roses, so the bowel to the lungs. As roots are to roses, so the bowel to the liver. As roots are to roses, so the bowel to the kidneys. These are the simple lessons which were taught to me by my microscope, my lab analyzers, my patients, and my friends on my autopsy table. The scientific basis of these statements are simple. Most inflammatory, immune, chronic infectious, and degenerative disorders begin in fermenting bowels. Less commonly, these disorders begin in the fermenting minds.

To Heal the Body, One Must Begin With Healing the Bowel

The most remarkable phenomenon in human biology is: A vast number of clinical problems that are seemingly unrelated to the bowel spontaneously resolve when the focus of clinical care shifts from other body organs to bowel ecology. How often do symptoms of persistent debilitating fatigue in young men and women clear up when an altered state of bowel ecology is restored to normal? How often do troublesome mood swings subside when therapies focus on the bowel? How often does arthralgia (pain and stiffness in joints with or without joint swelling) resolve when all the bowel issues are addressed? How often do we successfully prevent chronic headache; anxiety; palpitations; incapacitating PMS; recurrent attacks of vaginitis; asthma and skin lesions by correcting the abnormalities in the internal environment of the bowel? The answers to these questions will vary widely among physicians.

Doctors who ignore the bowel (and those who never understood the issues of bowel ecology in the first place) will dismiss the questions I raise with scorn. None of this has been proven with double-blind cross-over studies, they will protest. Other physicians who have learned to respect the bowel — as the ancients did — and care for their patients with a sharp focus on bowel issues will readily and unequivocally validate my personal clinical experience.

Who Should Consider Dr. Ali’s Course on Bowel Healing?

Anyone with love of learning, passion for knowledge, and interest in health and healing. Specifically, the course is designed to serve the educational needs of individuals who:

* Are healthy and wish to continue to be so;
* Desire the same for their family;
* Need to address a personal health problem;
* Are involved in the care of someone else with chronic medical conditions;
* Might consider a career in healing arts;
* Have decided to study health, nutrition, nursing, or medicine.

A Worthy Path

When beginning an authentic and worthy path, one must recognize that it takes longer than expected but goes much further than imagines. Please recognize that the Course On Bowel Healing demands much at the front-end but delivers much, much more at the tail-end. Your reason for considering the Course may be just to learn about your health problem or disease. By the time you finish it you will know that this is the path to healthful aging, as well as to preventing and reversing all acquired chronic diseases.

COLITIS
We have found the following measures to be useful for prevention of acute colitis attacks in patients with history of Crohns’ disease, ulcerative colitis and related chronic bowel conditions. We ask you to consider them when you suffer from acute stress, viral infections or are exposed to chemicals and mold – the events that can cause acute colitis attacks. Again, we advise the following:
A. Unscheduled visit to the Institute for physician evaluation.
B. Take the following steps for a period of three days. If you have suffered initial adverse responses to previous natural therapies in the past, please begin the detox program slowly, taking one step at a time.

1. Stay overhydrated from morning till 8 PM with 8 to 10 glasses of water (8-ounce glass). Water helps in many ways. It is the best mucus-thinner, detoxificant, diuretic and cell resuscitator.

2. Do rice and/or soy protein and vegetable juice fast. Small amounts of fruit juices may be added to change taste.

3. Use coffee enema once or twice a day for three days. Follow the Institute protocol (copies available in offices).
4. Take Rowasa enema or Pentasa in the doses that you used before if such drugs were helpful on previous occasions.
5. Gargle with Throat Protocol and follow additional steps outlined in the yellow Throat Protocol Sheet.
6. Follow the Institute’s Essential Oils Protocol (copies available in offices)
7. Arrange to receive an appropriate intramuscular nutrient injection or one of the appropriate IV infusions at the Institute.
8. Do autoregulation with Autoreg Tape three times a day.
9. Take two tablets of Bowel Ecology #10 Protocol four times a day.
10. Take two tablets of Glutathione Protocol four times a day.
11. Hydrotherapy, and therapies involving body brushing and deep lymphatic massage are helpful if experienced professionals are available to administer them.
12. After acute symptoms have cleared up but some abdominal discomfort persists, please strictly follow your assigned food plan (avoiding allergic foods) for three days after finishing the vegetable juice fast.
13. Consult a staff physician for examination and other necessary measures. Again, safety first. Please consider a visit with your primary care physician or an Institute physician if symptoms of colitis persist in spite of the above measures.


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