A1c Level Intentionally Kept High in Type 1 Diabetes Majid Ali, M.D.


Majid Ali, M.D.

The blood A1c value indicates the average of blood glucose levels during the preceding 80 to 100 days. The )test value is a percentage of a blood protein that becomes “sticky” due to sugar attached to it—the higher the blood glucose (blood sugar level), the larger the percentage of sticky protein.

In healthy people, 5 to 5.5 percent of the protein called Hb is sticky with sugar (glycated (Hb) hemoglobin is the scientific term for it). In people with diabetes, a value of 6 percent or higher is generally accepted as an indication of poor diabetes control. Some doctors deliberately allow A1c level to remain high in their patients with Type 1 diabetes. In my view, this is acceptable only if all relevant dietary, nutritional, environmental, and detox remedies have failed to keep the patient in sugar balance (metabolic equilibrium) and the A1c value below 6 percent.

A1c Level Intentionally Kept High

Here is a revealing case study of a 37-year-old patient with Type 1 diabetes on insulin pump. She was receiving a daily basal dose of insulin of 18.2 units. She also administered herself a bolus dose of regular insulin with each meal, three times a day, the dose usually being two or three units at a time. She consulted me for a massive bilateral leg lymphedema which developed after an automobile accident. Here is my conversation with her:

“What was your breakfast today?”
“Piece of toast with butter and cheese.”
“Your lunch yesterday?”
“Cottage cheese and fresh peach.”
“Dinner yesterday?”
“Chicken and pasta. I put in 52 carbs, BS was 177, insulin 3.7 units of insulin.”
“What is your recent A1c?”
“6.9%.”
“Why is it so high if you are on an insulin pump?”
“Because my diabetologist wants to keep blood sugar at around 150 to 170.”
“Why?”
“Because I don’t feel my blood sugar dropping?”
“What do you think would happen if your blood sugar went down to 70?”
“Nothing.”

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