OXYGEN AND EARLY AFRICAN MEDICINE


Early African medicine?Nubian and prenubian that preceded the latter Indian and Chinese medical traditions by thousands of years? recognized the essential roles of diet and environment in the cause of disease. It held that diseases are caused by the substances people fed on. This was the beginning of the scientific method in healing arts since it focused on the observable natural phenomena, which is founded on testability?hence refutability? of observations, as well conclusions drawn from them. If one were to enlarge the concept of disease being caused by what was fed on?oxygen, in my view, is the single most important nutrient?Africans can be seen as forerunners of integrative medicine to which I devote twelve volumes of my textbook entitled The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine.1-12

The Indians and Chinese, by contrast, developed systems of chakras, meridians, and humors that were clearly neither testable nor verifiable. I was prompted to write this brief article by a report published August 2010 in the journal Arthritis Care and Research. It reported that acupuncture was found to be no more effective than placebo in a study of 455 patients with arthritis and knee pain. On August 24, 2010, The New York Times published a commentary on this paper and related recent publications. It included responses from some practitioners of acupuncture who countered that the efficacy of their methods can be tested by ?Western methods??i.e. tested and validated by objective criteria, in other words. Putting aside the matter of the clinical value of acupuncture—its clinical benefits, in my experience, are superior when integrated with castor oil rubs, anti-inflammatory herbs, and trigger point therapies—the response of acupuncturists even in 2010 begs the issues of testability and refutability. By contrast, the early Africans focused on the testable and verifiable elements of diet and environment.

In February 2009, in Townsend Letter, I published my Eastern Track hypothesis which held that the African traditions predated and profoundly influenced the later evolution of the same in India and China. I marshaled a large body of evidence to support my view, including: (1) the knowledge of the structure and function of the human frame (anatomy, physiology); (2) ideas about the cause of disease (pathology); (3) diet and holism; (4) genetic influences; (5) therapeutic interventions; (6) advances in other lines of inquiry into natural phenomena; and (7) mythology and spiritual beliefs.

In saluting the scientific methods and the focus on diet and environment in the cause of disease of the early African, below I list the crucial importance of the Unifying Oxygen Model of Disease: (1) it explains the primary aging processes in the body; (2) it sheds light how health can be preserved by addressing all oxygen-related issues; (3) it elucidates how toxicities of foods, environments, and thoughts cause disease; (4) it allows the formulation and development of rational and effective designs for reversing chronic disease; and (5) it provides mechanisms by which time-honored natural remedies work.

I refer professional readers interested in the Unifying Oxygen Model of Disease to Darwin and Dysox Triology, the 10th, 11th, and 12th volumes of The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine.10-12

References

1. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume I: Nature’s Preoccupation With Complementarity and Contrariety. New York. Canary 21 Press. 1998. 2nd edition 2005.
2. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume II: The History and Philosphy of Integrative Medicine. 1998. 2nd edition 2006.. New York. Canary 21 Press
3 Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume III. Pathobiology by Micro-Ecologic Cellular and Macro-Ecologic Tissue-Organ Systems 1999. New York. Canary 21 Press.
4 Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume IV: Integrative Immunology and Allergy: The Oxidative Dysoxygenative Perspective. 2005. New York. Canary 21 Press. 1998.
5. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume V: Integrative Nutritional Medicine: Nutrition Seen Through the Prism of Oxygen Homeostasis. 2005. New York. Canary 21 Press. 1999.
6. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume VI: Integrative Cardiology and Chelation Therapies: The Oxidative Dysoxygenative Model and Chelation Therapies. . 2000. 2nd edition 2006. New York. Canary 21 Press
7. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume VII: Heavy Metal Load and Toxicity: Mercury Induced Dysoxygenosis. . 2001. 2nd edition 2005. New York. Canary 21 Press.
8. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume VIII: Integrative Endocrinology: The Hormone Receptor Restoration Model. 2006.New York. Canary 21 Press.
9. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume IX: Integrative Oncology:The Oxygen Protocol. New York. Canary 21 Press. 2006.
10. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume X: Darwin, Oxygen Homeostasis, and Oxystatic Therapies. (change sequence to NY – Press – year – and type the edition as above for consistency – also was there a first and second edition of this?)) 3 rd. Edi. (2009) New York. Institute of Integrative Medicine Press.
11. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume XI: Darwin, Dysox, and Disease. 2000. 3rd. Edi. 2008. New York. Integrative Medicine Press. (same comments as above for number 10)
12. Ali M. The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine Volume XII: Darwin, Dysox, and Integrative Protocols. 2009. New York. Institute of Integrative Medicine Press.

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